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Lukas Kozel

Managing Director & Co-founder

Mar 2018     5 min read

How to create and give a successful sales presentation?

Successful sales people break down their presentations into usable components, with each part becoming an important element in making a successful sale.

This article is brought to you as a review of an original post that you can find here.

Creating and preparing an effective sales presentation takes plenty of planning and a whole lot of skill. Frequently sales professionals or others involved in the sales process do not adequately prepare for the delivery of the presentation — they just let it happen. This module will take you through the steps necessary for a successful presentation — from the all too important preparation phase to the often-forgotten critique stage.

Before you start

Each sales professional has their own perception of what a presentation is and how it is constructed. One definition that could be, "A complete sales package that is given to a prospect for the purpose of getting him to commit to purchase a product or service."

The sales presentation should begin long before a sales person meets a prospect. Successful sales people break down their presentations into usable components, with each part becoming an important element in making a successful sale. This doesn’t happen by magic. It takes preparation, and the more prepared the sales person is, the greater the chance of success.

The better you know your subject matter and the more prepared you are, the more comfortable you will be during the presentation and the more effective and exciting your selling will become.

The basis for your presentation should be the prospect’s needs and how you intend to solve them. In Presentations Plus, author David A. Peoples says, before preparing a presentation you must ask yourself, "Why are you making this presentation?"

Preparation

The first part of the preparation phase is getting organized. You must organize your presentation and materials ahead of time. Make a list of what you need in the way of information and gather what you need, leaving nothing to chance.

The second part of the preparation is a complete and thorough knowledge of:

What is being sold
The competition

The customer

The market

Fact-finding and organizing information into a logical order is critical here.

A starting date or delivery date may also be helpful and could make the difference in getting the order or not. It is important to strike a balance here — if you can "start immediately", the client may feel that you are not busy, and he may conjure up his own reasons of why that is. On the other hand, if you put a start/delivery date too far out, you run the risk of cooling off a hot prospect. The best advice is to use your best judgment along with the information you already know about your prospect. If they needed it yesterday, you’ll know what to do.

End your presentation with a closing paragraph which contains a statement of interest in doing the work for the prospective client. This part can also be used to restate the benefits of doing business with your company. For instance, "All the employees at TRED are dedicated to the highest of quality standards in product and in service. Our free overnight delivery service means no spare part inventory for you…"

First impressions

When you first meet someone, how long does it take you to size him up and decide whether you like him or not? Well, it’s a two-way street. Your prospect will be sizing you up before you make your first statement, just as you will be with him. To maximize your chances for a good first impression, walk into the meeting confident, holding your head and body erect, keeping a smile on your face and making good eye contact.

People like doing business with people they like. This is an opportune time to find out about your prospect’s interests, his family, what he does when he’s not working. Selling is about relationships. It’s about trusting the person who’s making the sale. It’s about caring for the customer who’s making the purchase. When you know the "person," it provides you with many opportunities to reinforce the message that you care for the "customer."

Anticipating objections

Another key component of your sales presentation is how well you can anticipate and handle the prospect’s objections. It doesn’t matter how well prepared your presentation is, nor how well you have rehearsed it, the prospect is still liable to throw you acurve ball. When you review your presentation and get to a point where you think there might be an objection, write the objection down on a separate piece of paper. Continue doing this until you think you have found all of the objections possible and answer them.

When this exercise is completed, give the presentation to a friend or colleague and ask him to think up objections to your presentation. Compare notes. Has he found other objections that you never thought of? Answer these objections and include themas part of your presentation in the form of positive statements.

The sales delivery

This is the actual communication between the sales person and the prospect. Remember, it is not always what you say to the prospect, but how you say it that makes an impression on the prospect. During your presentation, there will be times when you must convey confidence, compassion and concern for the prospect and his needs. If you can do this well, you can often establish a strong bond with your prospect.

- If your sales presentation requires that you give a talk, write it down, verbatim.
- Always speak in a confident tone of voice, at a good pace and very deliberately.
- Be sure that the prospect is following what you are saying.
- If you are planning a demonstration as part of your presentation, design it step-by-step.

Presentation ads

To supplement your knowledge of the products and services and how they will satisfy the prospect’s needs, you might consider using audiovisual materials. They can be tremendously effective for any presentation if they are used properly. Presentation aids should, however, enhance, not distract, and they shouldn’t be so slick asto confuse the prospect on the intended message.

The most important visual aid is your product or service. Whenever possible, show the product or examples of your service to the prospect. Let the audiovisual presentation appeal to the prospect’s senses of sight and sound, and let the actual product or service bring the presentation together.

Post presentation

After the presentation, it’s valuable to review what took place — not only what went wrong, but what you did right as well. Analyze each part of the presentation from the opening to the close. Take everything into account from the physical setting toyour performance. If possible, get some feed back from the prospect. Think about what you would do differently next time. If you complete an analysis after each presentation, you will be well on your way to becoming a successful sales person.

This article is brought to you as a review of an original post that you can find here.

 " Problem with  
  being good is  
  it is pointless  
  if nobody  
  knows about
  you."  

Empty

Solves who you are.
The Brand DNA is a strategic document describing your brand, your business and your audience so you can make right decisions more efficiently.

More...

 

Solves how to present who you are.
You only have one chance to make a great first impression so you better do it righ. With a professional presentation you just can not do it wrong.

More...

 

Solves how to present who you are online.
If you want to be a successful organization and you still do not have a well-designed website, you are doing it wrong.

More...

 

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   FOR BETTER EXPERIENCE, TURN YOUR TABLET INTO A LANDSCAPE POSITION, PLEASE.  

Mar 2018     5 min read

How to create and give a successful sales presentation?

Successful sales people break down their presentations into usable components, with each part becoming an important element in making a successful sale.

This article is brought to you as a review of an original post that you can find here.

Creating and preparing an effective sales presentation takes plenty of planning and a whole lot of skill. Frequently sales professionals or others involved in the sales process do not adequately prepare for the delivery of the presentation — they just let it happen. This module will take you through the steps necessary for a successful presentation — from the all too important preparation phase to the often-forgotten critique stage.

Before you start

Each sales professional has their own perception of what a presentation is and how it is constructed. One definition that could be, "A complete sales package that is given to a prospect for the purpose of getting him to commit to purchase a product or service."

The sales presentation should begin long before a sales person meets a prospect. Successful sales people break down their presentations into usable components, with each part becoming animportant element in making a successful sale. This doesn’thappen by magic. It takes preparation, and the more prepared the sales person is, the greater the chance of success.

The better you know your subject matter and the more prepared you are, the more comfortable you will be during the presentation and the more effective and exciting your selling will become.

The basis for your presentation should be the prospect’s needsand how you intend to solve them. In Presentations Plus, authorDavid A. Peoples says, before preparing a presentation you must ask yourself, "Why are you making this presentation?"

Preparation
The first part of the preparation phase is getting organized. You must organize your presentation and materials ahead of time. Make a list of what you need in the way of information and gather what you need, leaving nothing to chance.

The second part of the preparation is a complete and thorough knowledge of:

What is being sold
The competition
The customer
The market

Fact-finding and organizing information into a logical order is critical here.

A starting date or delivery date may also be helpful and could make the difference in getting the order or not. It is important to strike a balance here — if you can "start immediately", the client may feel that you are not busy, and he may conjure up his own reasons of why that is. On the other hand, if you put a start/delivery date too far out, you run the risk of cooling off a hot prospect. The best advice is to use your best judgment along with the information you already know about your prospect. If they needed it yesterday, you’ll know what to do.

End your presentation with a closing paragraph which contains a statement of interest in doing the work for the prospective client. This part can also be used to restate the benefits of doing business with your company. For instance, "All the employees at TRED are dedicated to the highest of quality standards in product and in service. Our free overnight delivery service means no spare part inventory for you…"

First impressions
When you first meet someone, how long does it take you to size him up and decide whether you like him or not? Well, it’s a two-way street. Your prospect will be sizing you up before you make your first statement, just as you will be with him. To maximize your chances for a good first impression, walk into the meeting confident, holding your head and body erect, keeping a smile on your face and making good eye contact.

People like doing business with people they like. This is an opportune time to find out about your prospect’s interests, his family, what he does when he’s not working. Selling is about relationships. It’s about trusting the person who’s making the sale. It’s about caring for the customer who’s making the purchase. When you know the "person," it provides you with many opportunities to reinforce the message that you care for the "customer."

Anticipating objection
Another key component of your sales presentation is how well you can anticipate and handle the prospect’s objections. It doesn’t matter how well prepared your presentation is, nor how well you have rehearsed it, the prospect is still liable to throw you acurve ball. When you review your presentation and get to a point where you think there might be an objection, write the objection down on a separate piece of paper. Continue doing this until you think you have found all of the objections possible and answer them.

When this exercise is completed, give the presentation to a friend or colleague and ask him to think up objections to your presentation. Compare notes. Has he found other objections that you never thought of? Answer these objections and include themas part of your presentation in the form of positive statements.

The sales delivery
This is the actual communication between the sales person and the prospect. Remember, it is not always what you say to the prospect, but how you say it that makes an impression on the prospect. During your presentation, there will be times when you must convey confidence, compassion and concern for the prospect and his needs. If you can do this well, you can often establish a strong bond with your prospect.

- If your sales presentation requires that you give a talk, write it down, verbatim.
- Always speak in a confident tone of voice, at a good pace and very deliberately.
- Be sure that the prospect is following what you are saying.
- If you are planning a demonstration as part of your presentation, design it step-by-step.

Presentation ads
To supplement your knowledge of the products and services and how they will satisfy the prospect’s needs, you might consider using audiovisual materials. They can be tremendously effective for any presentation if they are used properly. Presentation aids should, however, enhance, not distract, and they shouldn’t be so slick asto confuse the prospect on the intended message.

The most important visual aid is your product or service. Whenever possible, show the product or examples of your service to the prospect. Let the audiovisual presentation appeal to the prospect’s senses of sight and sound, and let the actual product or service bring the presentation together.

Post presentation
After the presentation, it’s valuable to review what took place — not only what went wrong, but what you did right as well. Analyze each part of the presentation from the opening to the close. Take everything into account from the physical setting toyour performance. If possible, get some feed back from the prospect. Think about what you would do differently next time. If you complete an analysis after each presentation, you will be well on your way to becoming a successful sales person.

This article is brought to you as a review of an original post that you can find here.

 "Problem with being good is it is pointless if nobody knows about you." 

--

Top 3 services every organization needs today.

Solves who you are.
The Brand DNA is a strategic document describing your brand, your business & your audience so you can make right decisions more efficiently.
 More...

Solves how to present who you are.
You only have one chance to make a great 1st impression so you better do it right. With a professional presentation you will do it right.
 More...

Solves how to present who you are online.
If you want to be a successful organization and you still do not have a well-designed website, you are doing it wrong.
 More...

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